Mob justice.

Apparently it is not considered ‘good form’ to refer to the Local Shop customers as ‘blank-eyed harridans’ or ‘the zombie horde’ even though both, especially the latter, are true. It has taken me a long time to realise why I’m the only one who feels like he’s in a zombie film sometimes.

Once an hour, the jannie on duty has to do a floor check. This is hardly an onerous task in little Local Shop. All it involves is checking each aisle for dropped things or spilled things and sorting out any we find. Most times it takes five minutes.

When doing this I am not shopping nor am I stacking shelves or checking expiry dates since I never do any of those things in there. Those jobs are for customers and staff. So the customers and staff are concentrating on one job, the job involving the shelf directly in front of them, while I am idly scanning the whole place for anything out of place. They are tightly focused on a small area, my attention is widened to take in a large area at that point.

That’s why I notice that, often, the shop is full of silent, shuffling people who don’t know each other and are therefore not conversing. It’s also why the staff and other customers don’t notice that we are enacting a scene from ‘Dawn of the Dead’ and I’m the one pretending to be a zombie so as not to be noticed.

There are other things to find. Lazy buggers drop items they’re looking at and instead of picking them up, they kick them under the shelves. I have a grabber-thing to hook those items back out. Occasionally there are coins, usually pennies and fivepences that I suppose aren’t really worth the effort of picking up any more.

When I find coins I put them on the nearest till, on the (rarely manned) customer services desk or just on a shelf so a local child can have a bit of extra pocket money. It is a bad idea to have cash on you when working in a shop. My wallet stays in the locker.

It’s a sensible rule. Suppose I took £20 out of the cash machine on the way to work (it is pure coincidence that that is the price of Ben Bracken) and left it in my pocket. When cashing up, one till is found to be £20 short. There would naturally be a pocket-check on all staff. It’s what I would do if I was manager.

So the till is down £20 and I have £20 cash in my pocket. Looks bad, doesn’t it? I almost never get a receipt from the cash machine and that wouldn’t prove innocence anyway. Possession of the money also would not prove guilt but it would make continued working in Local Shop very difficult. So I get rid of any coins I find at once. The situation therefore cannot arise.

Even if, later, it was found that the missing £20 had slipped under the till drawer, that initial suspicion would linger. Every time something went missing, whispers would start and fingers would point. The only safe way is to follow that rule – never have cash on you when working in a shop.

The mentality that spawned the Inquisition, that drives North Korea’s Gangnam-style leader, is still alive in all of humanity. Especially the stupid ones. If you are accused then you must have done something. Otherwise why would you be suspected of anything at all?

Jimmy Saliva is now being villified as a terrible, terrible man – but we can never hear his side of the story. It is said that he seduced young girls but I was alive at that time. I remember the girls screaming at the Beatles and the Stones and throwing themselves at pop stars and disc jockeys. I really doubt that very much ‘seduction’ was really required.

While I always did, and still do, regard Saliva as a creepy weirdo, I think the allegations are blown way out of proportion. Maybe he did commit rape and he almost certainly had sex with underage girls but there has been nothing to suggest paedophilia. Nothing involving small children, none of the really nasty stuff. Nothing claimed against him has been proven and yet it is all accepted as fact.

Now we have all sorts of sex-pest allegations coming out of the woodwork that are not so much ‘historic’ as ‘antique’. Stuart Hall was the only one convicted and that’s because he confessed. He must be kicking himself now – not one other case has stood up in court.

Lives are ruined anyway. That bloke from the garage on Coronation Street was found not guilty – but the case dragged up his infidelity and drinking and splashed them all over the news. Nobody cared about those non-crimes before but if he wasn’t fiddling with kiddies, he must be guilty of something. The Daily Inquisition had photos of him, after his trial, having one (yes one) pint of beer and crowed about his alcoholism. Really? They should try visiting a smoky-drinky, and none of us are alkies. None of us wake up and want booze before coffee and all of us can leave the drink alone when it has to be left alone.

As now – I have to get up early tomorrow so can eye up the Caol Ila but not drink any. I’d have peat-breath in the morning and the blank-eyed harridans would probably complain. That one gets saved for savouring later, on nights when I’m not working the next day. If I am working in the afternoon I can easily get through at least half a bottle of whisky the night before  and be fine for work. Maybe I can do that with an 8 am wake-up too, but it’ll hurt, so I won’t. Whisky is limited this week but I have six days off next week… the bottle recyclers will get a boost.

I am digressing as usual. The point in the case of the garage bloke is that he has been villified for things that a) he was never charged with and b) aren’t actually crimes.

The confirmed shirt-lifter Nigel Evans was on the radio at work today. He has been accused of gay rape and has been found not guilty. Not good enough for the hounds that now infest Guido Fawkes’ comments. I remember when that place was worth commenting at and visiting often. It was, in fact, Guido and Devil’s Kitchen (along with the smoking ban) that were instrumental in turning this place from a Livejournal absurdist blog into something that beat MPs in the Total Politics listings. Now, any comment left at Guido’s is lost among the mass of trolls and loonies he lets out to play there. That’s not free speech. That’s just a mess.

Guido’s article says that Sarah Woolaston was involved in a smear campaign against Evans. All I see in what he has written there is someone going to Ms Woolaston and saying they’ve been poked in places they’d rather not have been poked in and on hearing this, she advised them to contact the police. Which, based on what she is likely to have heard, is what pretty much anyone would have said. No conspiracy there. If someone came to me and said they’d been raped – in any hole – my response would be the same. Talk to the police, there’s bugger all I can do about it.

So Nigel Evans was charged, lost his job as deputy speaker, had all sorts of private-life stuff dragged into the open and spent all his money paying for his defence. And was found not guilty. So that should be the end of it, right?

Nope. He was accused so he must be guilty of something.

Whether you agree with or approve of his sexual preferences is irrelevant. He was charged with a crime, taken to court, and found not guilty of that crime. Either we have a justice system or we don’t. Okay, it’s a random pile of nonsense most of the time but we either accept the verdict or descend into total anarchy with mobs dispensing Inquisition-style punishments for crimes admitted to under the sort of torture that would get you to admit you rape shrews.

Nigel Evans says his court costs should be paid. Yes they should. If he had been found guilty you can bet he’d be paying the CPS costs. In every case where the defendant is found not guilty, the cost of defence should be paid by the accuser. That should be standard practice.

Here is a snippet from Guido’s article –

That shock, he says, turned to anger when Evans appeared defiant in interviews with several Sunday newspapers. Nigel would not admit a crime, he did admit making an inappropriate drunken pass at me. Surely that is wrong. His audacity in the aftermath of the trial is galling. To see him paint himself as the victim in all this is just awful.” 

If he has been acquitted, why would he admit a crime? The accusations were tested in court and he was not guilty. No crime. An inappropriate drunken pass is not a crime. It used to be, back when being gay was illegal and that’s not all that far back. Do the progressives who infest Guido’s comments want a return to the trial of Oscar Wilde?

The whole ‘sexual assault’ thing is overblown. If some drunk guy fondled my danglies I would be, to put it mildly, unimpressed. But I would shrug it off and avoid that guy in future. It is not a matter for the police. If the same guy set about me with a lump hammer I would definitely call the police. Yet the drunken fondling is sexual assault and that is far more important than the lump hammer assault. Even though the former is an annoyance and the latter is a lot of actual pain.

I don’t care about Nigel Evans’ sexual preferences. It’s not as if he lives next door or is ever likely to. So his home life is none of my concern. In fact, I don’t care about the home lives of the people who really do live next door. This bloke’s private life is of no interest at all.

And it should be of no interest or relevance to anyone else. Did he poke a bloke who preferred to remain unpoked? The court decided that no, he did not. So give him back his job and give him back his money. As for the other charges, unwelcome fondling is an annoyance and not something that causes lasting damage unless you are so dreadfully insecure that I can take your soul and shred it with a few words. I have met such people.

Some of those ‘victims’ didn’t even consider themselves victims. What a farce.

It is not, as Banjo Boy thinks, anything to do with homophobia. It is not even to do with MPs although it is hard to argue against the idea of giving them a little taste of what they inflict on the rest of us now and then.

No, it is all to do with public humiliation of those in the public eye. Killing your heroes. Get the drones to a point where they cannot trust anyone, cannot hear the words of those who are not Of The Left and will rise, mob-like, on command, to bring down the heretic. Even when the prosecution fails to burn them.

Heard any allegations against any Leftie celebs? No, neither have I. Only Cyril Smith, who is accused of poking small boys with something he couldn’t possibly reach and would have needed a complex arrangement of mirrors to even see. But then he was a Lib Dem and the hard left don’t like those either. Noticed that the Cyril Smith stuff came out after the Libbies lumped in with the Tories? Coincidence, surely.

Enough for tonight. I have to sleep.

 

Hat-tip to Roobedoo for those links.

 

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21 thoughts on “Mob justice.

  1. One thing I can’t understand is with the growing number of cases where these people have been found not guilty (I’m thinking Bill Roach and garage bloke here) these were both found not-guilty, surely something should happen to the accusers for lying right? I think this is one of the reasons we are getting so many of these cases, people are spotting the chance of a few quid and are jumping on the ruddy bandwagon en masse.

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    • That’ll never happen. Because we don’t prosecute a bank manager for lying when the getaway driver is acquitted, or a householder when a burglar is found not guilty.

      ‘Not guilty’ doesn’t mean ‘innocent’, it just means ‘the State couldn’t prove its case to the standard needed’.

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      • But the getaway driver could sue for libel or slander if he so wished provided he can establish a loss. He could also sue the manager for malicious prosecution if he could show the Police to be purely relying on his statements and, because it’s vicarious, the Bank.

        Not easy as civil cases have a standard of ‘probability’ as opposed to criminal ‘beyond reasonable doubt’. but can and has been done. Even with this, though, it’s always difficult to prove ‘innocence’ as people operate simply and wrongly on a ‘no smoke without fire’ basis i.e. ultimate trust in the accuser and the Police. Too much for a cynic like me.

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      • Something can happen to the accusers but not through State intervention. Freddie Starr threatened to bring a private prosecution against the woman who accused him, through libel laws. It went quiet. Possibly he was talked out of it as something that would just bring more bad press.

        It depends on whether the accused/acquited has the money to do it, which is a little unfair. However, if the State did it automatically then nobody would ever report a crime again. If the criminal gets off, you go to jail instead!

        That’s a hell of a risk.

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    • XX both found not-guilty, surely something should happen to the accusers for lying right? XX

      The defendent, on being found not guilty, hear, can sue the accuser for Beleidigung/Verleumidung. Basically Slander and lible.

      There is also the possibility of making a complaint to the police over Falsche Verdächtigung, “false allegations,” and all that comes from that.

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        • A lot of these historical UK ‘paedo’ cases wouldn’t fly before a German Court or even get past the local Staatsanwaltschaft (DA’s/Public Persecutur’s, Procotor Gamble and Fecal’s Office) because , AFAIK, German law still has that whole pesky “in dubio pro reo” thing about ‘if in doubt then the accused must be believed” and “Aussage gegen Aussage’ (‘word against word’ie verbal testimony requires physical evidence). Fortunately in the UK we have updated our staid laws -introducing such things as ‘double jeopardy’ and 3rd hand verbal testimony is to be treated as PROOF for the SAKE OF THE VICTIMS of course.

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          • America also has a statute of limitation. If you don’t report the crime within a certain number of years then no prosecution is possible. Their courts don’t get clogged up with ancient complaints based on cries of ‘Witch! Heretic!’ and nothing else as evidence.

            Expect to hear soon that some aged celebrity has been accused of turning an entire audience into toads, and then flying away cackling on a broom. The CPS will investigate that.

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            • It said on the German news last night that they want to change the statute of limitations for historical sex crimes …for the sake of the VICTIMS of course. Although I noted with interest that the German news still, unenlightened as they are, speaks of “Child Pornography” and not the approved-by-CIF term of ” Child Abuse Pictures”.

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              • CIF are scared of the word pornography. Cheeldren might see it and decide to become Donkey Dick or Flaccid Flange or some other porn star name. It’s passive poking.

                So.. Germany wants to be able to prosecute a sixties boob-grope while ignoring a seventies stabbing… sounds like they are going all British on us.

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  2. “Guido’s article says that Sarah Woolaston was involved in a smear campaign against Evans. All I see in what he has written there is someone going to Ms Woolaston and saying they’ve been poked in places they’d rather not have been poked in and on hearing this, she advised them to contact the police. “

    Nope, she was a bit more active in the campaign than that. From the ‘Guardian’:

    “Wollaston, a GP with 20 years’ experience including a spell working as a police forensic examiner where she dealt with victims of sexual and domestic violence, told Bercow about both complaints against Evans at a meeting in the Speaker’s office, where Bercow’s secretary and the alleged sexual assault victim were also present.

    Bercow said it was for the young man to decide whether he should take the matter to police. A meeting with the alleged rape victim was scheduled for the following week but, following legal advice from the Speaker’s counsel Michael Carpenter, Bercow’s secretary informed Wollaston that the Speaker “cannot handle this”.

    Wollaston, frustrated by the response from Bercow’s office, took the matter into her own hands and passed a police telephone number to both men, telling them they had a duty to come forward and ensure Evans was apprehended before any other young men were assaulted.”

    She didn’t advise, she encouraged.

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    • The Squeaker’s attitude was the right one, for a change. It is up to the aggreived, not some nannying fussbucket, to report crimes to the police.

      Wollaston (I spelled her name wrong in the article but see no purpose in fixing it now) seems to disagree. Although to be fair, she might have pushed them into reporting it but stopped short of frogmarching them into the police station and shouting “Look what the nasty bully did to my little boy!”

      There is hope for her yet, I think. But then, she is a politician, so it’s only a slim hope.

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  3. I find it outrageous that Evans is not being reimbursed for the costs of funding his defence since he was found not guilty. Although the details were rather sordid, he has had his reputation completely trashed in public. He will be recognised in public. His accusers are anonymous. The least he should expect is to receive his costs, preferably from the CPS budget.

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    • That used to happen. The government changed the law a few years back so that nobody can get their costs back when acquitted from charges brought by the CPS.

      Nigel Evans supported that change.

      Which makes me chuckle.

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  4. Perhaps if the CPS were forced to reimburse these cases they would hesitate to employ very high priced QCs and bring cases that, for the most part, seem no more than the trivial groping or drunken passes most of us have experienced at some time. It is disgraceful that this man and others acquited not only have their reputation ruined but are bankrupted as well.

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    • I find it astounding that the police are even required to investigate a drunken fumble. That used to be dealt with by the one fumbled, usually with a slap across the face or a knee in the nadgers.

      But then, that’s now assault. So they have to call the police instead.

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  5. As the fellow asked outside the courtroom where he had been declared not guilty, “Now where do I go to get my reputation back?”

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